PUBLICATIONS

Reliable Capacity Provisioning for Distributed Cloud/Edge/Fog Computing Applications

Authors:

P-O Ostberg, James Byrne, Paolo Casari, Philip Eardley, Antonio Fernández Anta, Johan Forsman, John Kennedy, Thang Le Duc, Manuel Noya Mariño, Radhika Loomba, Miguel Angel López Peña, Jose Lopez Veiga, Theo Lynn, Vincenzo Mancuso, Sergej Svorobej, Anders Torneus, Stefan Wesner, Peter Willis, Jörg Domaschka

Abstract:

The REliable CApacity Provisioning and enhanced remediation for distributed cloud applications (RECAP) project aims to advance cloud and edge computing technology, to develop mechanisms for reliable capacity provisioning, and to make application placement, infrastructure management, and capacity provisioning autonomous, predictable and optimized. This paper presents the RECAP vision for an integrated edge-cloud architecture, discusses the scientific foundation of the project, and outlines plans for toolsets for continuous data collection, application performance modeling, application and component auto-scaling and remediation, and deployment optimization. The paper also presents four use cases from complementing fields that will be used to showcase the advancements of RECAP.

A Preliminary Systematic Review of Computer Science Literature on Cloud Computing Research using Open Source Simulation Platforms

Authors:

Theo Lynn, Anna Gourinovitch, James Byrne, PJ Byrne, Sergej Svorobej, Konstaninos Giannoutakis, David Kenny and John Morrison

Abstract:

Research and experimentation on live hyperscale clouds is limited by their scale, complexity, value and and issues of commercial sensitivity. As a result, there has been an increase in the development, adaptation and extension of cloud simulation platforms for cloud computing to enable enterprises, application developers and researchers to undertake both testing and experimentation. While there have been numerous surveys of cloud simulation platforms and their features, few surveys examine how these cloud simulation platforms are being used for research purposes. This paper provides a preliminary systematic review of literature on this topic covering 256 papers from 2009 to 2016. The paper aims to provide insights into the current status of cloud computing research using open source cloud simulation platforms. Our two-level analysis scheme includes a descriptive and synthetic analysis against a highly cited taxonomy of cloud computing. The analysis uncovers some imbalances in research and the need for a more granular and refined taxonomy against which to classify cloud computing research using simulators. The paper can be used to guide literature reviews in the area and identifies potential research opportunities for cloud computing and simulation researchers, complementing extant surveys on cloud simulation platforms.

A Review of Cloud Computing Simulation Platforms and Related Environments

Authors:

James Byrne, Sergej Svorobej, Konstantinos Giannoutakis, Dimitrios Tzovaras, PJ Byrne, P-O Östberg, Anna Gourinovitch, Theo Lynn

Abstract:

Recent years have seen an increasing trend towards the development of Discrete Event Simulation (DES) platforms to support cloud computing related decision making and research. The complexity of cloud environments is increasing with scale and heterogeneity posing a challenge for the efficient management of cloud applications and data centre resources. The increasing ubiquity of social media, mobile and cloud computing combined with the Internet of Things and emerging paradigms such as Edge and Fog Computing is exacerbating this complexity. Given the scale, complexity and commercial sensitivity of hyperscale computing environments, the opportunity for experimentation is limited and requires substantial investment of resources both in terms of time and effort. DES provides a low risk technique for providing decision support for complex hyperscale computing scenarios. In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the development and extension of tools to support DES for cloud computing resulting in a wide range of tools which vary in terms of their utility and features. Through a review and analysis of available literature, this paper provides an overview and multi-level feature analysis of 33 DES tools for cloud computing environments. This review updates and extends existing reviews to include not only autonomous simulation platforms, but also on plugins and extensions for specific cloud computing use cases. This review identifies the emergence of CloudSim as a de facto base platform for simulation research and shows a lack of tool support for distributed execution (parallel execution on distributed memory systems).